Blog博客

Rio de Janeiro turns garbage into energy

Rio de Janeiro, a city of about 6.7 million is also one of more than 70 cities worldwide that are aiming to become “carbon neutral” by 2050, meaning they will produce no more climate-changing emissions than they can offset by other means, such as planting carbon-absorbing trees.

From planting trees to promoting renewable energy and cleaner methods of transport, such as electric cars and buses, each city is going about achieving its carbon neutral goals in different ways, and with varying degrees of success.

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Whirlpool provides energy to rural areas

This whirlpool can power a small village. It provides energy 24 hours a day. It can be installed in most streams and canals wherever a natural height difference occurs. It’s designed to bring electricity to rural areas and doesn’t require skilled labour to build.  Current technology is invasive and destructive but this device won’t harm the ecosystem.

How does it work?

It’s installed at a small,natural height difference. Land is excavated near the water. Prefabricated parts are installed, then the core of the turbine. The land is filled back in. Then the river wall is opened and the turbine starts working 24/7. The generator is the only moving part so it reduces the chance of failure.

This tech is being tested in rural areas and is producing promising results. It could energise the world over. What’s better than clean energy for all?

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Australian engineers quietly changing the world

Australian engineers have created some of the most incredible, life-changing innovations of past years. But very little is known about them, with everyday Australians often unaware that these inventions are homegrown. Now you can follow their journeys! With thanks to Engineers Australia for this wonderful initiative.

Check out episode 1 below:

EPISODE 1: The Planet Earth Avenger

EPISODE 1: The Planet Earth Avenger, Darren, takes on plastic pollution and turns waste into treasure. Want to become an engineering superhero and change the world?Join us today: http://bit.ly/planet-earth-avenger

Posted by Engineers Australia on Sunday, 17 February 2019

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What is smart city?

These modern cities, capable of implementing infrastructures (of water, electricity, gases, transport, etc.) communicating and sustainable to improve citizens’ comfort while developing in the environmental protection.

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Space technology to predict droughts several months in advance

Scientists from ANU have used new space technology to predict droughts and increased bushfire risk up to five months in advance.

ANU researcher Siyuan Tian said the team knew they needed to move into space to get closer to understanding the complex nature of drought.

They used data from multiple satellites to measure water below the Earth’s surface with unprecedented precision, and were able to relate this to drought impacts on the vegetation several months later.

“The way these satellites measure the presence of water on Earth is mind boggling,” said Ms Tian from the ANU Research School of Earth Sciences.

“We’ve been able to use them to detect variations in water availability that affect the growth and condition of grazing land, dryland crops and forests, and that can lead to increased fire risk and farming problems several months down the track.”

The drought forecasts will be combined with the latest satellite maps of vegetation flammability from the Australian Flammability Monitoring System at ANU to predict how the risk of uncontrollable bushfires will change over the coming months.

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Seabin: Rubbish bin for the ocean

More than 13 million tonnes of plastic enter Australia’s waterways every year, and some experts believe by 2050 there will be more plastic pieces in the world’s oceans than fish. Meet Seabin, a device designed to collect plastic waste floating in coastal areas before it gets to open water and breaks down into harmful microplastics.

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Earthquake-resistant concrete

A new seismic-resistant, fibre-reinforced concrete developed at the University of British Columbia will see its first real-life application this fall as part of the seismic retrofit of a Vancouver elementary school.

The material is engineered at the molecular scale to be strong, malleable, and ductile, similar to steel—capable of dramatically enhancing the earthquake resistance of a seismically vulnerable structure when applied as a thin coating on the surfaces.

Researchers subjected the material, called eco-friendly ductile cementitious composite (EDCC), to earthquake simulation tests using intensities as high as the magnitude 9.0–9.1 earthquake that struck Tohoku, Japan in 2011.

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Green Bus Rapid Transit

With funding from the international Green Climate Fund, Karachi will launch a zero-emission Green Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) network, with 200 buses fuelled by bio-methane.

The cheap, clean bus network will cater for 320,000 passengers daily, and will reduce planet-warming emissions by 2.6 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent over 30 years, according to project documents.

The Green Climate Fund, set up under U.N. climate talks to provide finance to developing countries to help them grow cleanly and adapt to a warming climate, will provide $49 million for the Karachi project out of a total cost of $583.5 million.

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